Time to Sew Quilt

Time to Sew Quilt

Time to Sew Quilt

Facts are facts. Quilters love fabric, and quilters love to give!

Since 2008, Moda has made it easy to combine those two passions with the annual Collection for a Cause. Every year, Moda releases a beautiful new fabric collection and donates its proceeds to charity. (How perfect is that?!)  

This week Jenny has taken the 2018 Collection for a Cause and transformed it into easy hourglasses and spool blocks. Click HERE to learn how to make this pretty quilt and support a great cause while you’re at it!

Time to Sew Quilt

Watch the Latest Tutorial from Missouri Star Quilt Co!

 

Easy Ribbon Quilt

Easy Ribbon Quilt

Easy Ribbon Quilt

Ribbons have long been used to show support for a cause. Yellow ribbons for military deployment. Purple ribbons for Alzheimer’s disease. Pink ribbons for breast cancer. It’s a simple way to say, “I care!”

Easy Ribbon Quilt

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Jenny is ready with a beautiful pink ribbon quilt. Watch the tutorial and follow Jenny’s instructions to make an Easy Ribbon Quilt of your own. Purchase the Easy Ribbon Quilt Kit and we will donate part of the profits to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Easy Ribbon Quilt

(Jenny’s quilt is pink for breast cancer awareness, but this quilt can also be made up in different colors as a tribute other causes. So many possibilities!)

Watch the Latest Tutorial from Missouri Star Quilt Co!

The Keeper of Kansas City Star Quilts: Edie McGinnis

The Keeper of Kansas City Star Quilts: Edie McGinnis

Edie McGinnis is one of our pattern writers here at Missouri Star. Some of her amazing Kansas City Star quilt collection is currently on display until Dec. 4 at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, KY. Read on to learn about how Edie started quilting, collecting quilts and her time at the Kansas City Star in her own words.

Edie McGinnis at Missouri Star Academy 2018

Edie shared quilts and stories at Missouri Star Academy earlier this year.

Before I began working as a pattern writer at Missouri Star Quilt Co., I spent many years of my life working for The Kansas City Star newspaper. I began in the composing room making up pages of the newspaper, bounced into the photo department, where I learned how to work with digital photos using Photoshop, then on to the newsroom where I answered phones and worked as the editor of the Star’s Block of the Month program as well as editing other quilt books and writing a few of my own.

Just before going to work at The Star, I had decided that I would like to have a quilt. My mother-in-law had lovely antique quilts, and there was always one on the bed in the guest room. I had never been around handmade quilts before. And it didn’t take me long to fall in love with those pretty old scrappy things that I could never look at enough. Every time I looked, I spotted a different fabric that I’d not noticed before.

Whirlygig Hexagon Quilt currently on display at the National Quilt Museum.

Whirlygig Hexagon Quilt

Surely I could make one! I knew how to sew and even though I didn’t own a sewing machine, I could stitch them by hand. After all, that’s how quilts had been made forever, right? I gave it a whirl and loved every step of the process. So began my quilting journey.

When I first began quilting, I had no idea that my work life and my hobby life would collide and turn into another career.

One day a friend of mine brought about 10 feed sacks to my home that her mom had saved from the 30s and 40s and gave them to me, thinking I might be able to use them to make a quilt. I thought and thought about how to use them, what pattern to use, what might look perfect for fabric from that era. While at the grocery store, I picked up a quilting magazine and found the pattern for the Whirligig Hexagon quilt. The magazine article talked about it being one of the patterns that had been published in The Kansas City Star. Wait! What? The Kansas City Star had published quilt patterns?

Pineapple Cactus Quilt on display at National Quilt Museum.

Pineapple Cactus Quilt on display at National Quilt Museum.

Yes, indeed they had, over 1,000 of them beginning in 1928 through 1961. I was so excited to learn all I could learn about the patterns. I found original patterns that quilters had cut and saved in scrap books and boxes. I collected all that I could find and I thought it would be wonderful to redo the patterns and put rotary cutting instructions with them and add in a seam allowances whether anyone else thought that was necessary or not.

I haunted the office of each publisher as they came and went. I told each inhabitant of that office that everyone was making money off of the Kansas City Star patterns but The Kansas City Star. Usually the response would be along the lines of, “Well, you know, my grandma used to quilt …” Or, “Yeah, well, we’re a newspaper and we don’t have much to do with quilting in this day and age.”

Missouri Star Academy attendees were treated to one of Edie’s famous trunk shows. Pictured are two versions of the Rocky Road to Kansas Quilt.

Then in 1999, The Star began a book publishing division and suddenly, those old patterns became books waiting to happen. And there I was, the only person at The Star who knew how to quilt. Kismet!

I became an advisor, then an author as well as an editor. I got to go to Quilt Market, set up the booth, recruit other authors and became the editor of The Star’s Block of the Month program. Eventually I worked solely for Kansas City Star Quilts and became the Associate Editor.

And when I could, I picked up an antique Kansas City Star Quilt. One at an antique shop here or an auction there or maybe even while cruising through eBay. Antique dealers at quilt market were a great resource. How I loved going through their stacks of beautiful quilts! So many choices in their booths!

Basket of Chips Quilt

The Basket of Chips Quilt, part of Edie’s trunk show at Missouri Star Academy.

I kept adding a quilt here and there and before I knew it, I actually had accrued a nice collection. They weren’t always pristine and many were a long way from perfect. But each represented the pattern from which it was made. The saddest part of my collection is that the quilts have no provenance so I don’t know who made each particular quilt.

Word got out about my collection and this spring I received a call from Frank Bennet at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky. He wanted to know if I had at least 32 Kansas City Star quilts. I told him I thought that was possible. Then he asked me if I would like to curate an exhibit of Kansas City Star quilts at the museum this September.

Cowboy Star Quilt

The Cowboy Star Quilt, currently on display at the National Quilt Museum.

How could anyone say no to such an opportunity?

The exhibit opened September 7 and runs through December 4. The museum is located at 215 Jefferson Street, Paducah, Kentucky, and is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday all year long. March 1 – November 30, it is also open on Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

And me? I still barely can believe I’m getting to do this!

Edie and Jenny at Missouri Star Academy in 2018.

Edie and Jenny at Missouri Star Academy in 2018.

Finish Line Quilt

Finish Line Quilt

Finish Line Quilt

If you ask Jenny, she really lucked out in the husband department. Ron is kind, patient, and incredibly creative. Best of all? When Jenny is quilting, he doesn’t sit on the sidelines; he quilts WITH her! Over the years Ron has cooked up a few great quilt patterns of his own!

Finish Line Quilt

Ron's Motorcycle Quilt

The Finish Line Quilt is a Ron Doan original, and it’s a good one! Click HERE to learn how to transform a simple Jelly Roll Race into an appliqué project featuring orange peel petals, motorcycles, or anything else your heart desires! The sky is the limit!

Finish Line Quilt

Watch the Latest Tutorial from Missouri Star Quilt Co!

Sundance Quilt

Sundance Quilt

Sundance Quilt

Fun fact: The cupcake was originally named for its super-simple recipe: 1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, and 4 eggs. No pinch. No dash. No hand-crafted vanilla or truffles foraged under a full moon. Just 6 cups & a handful of eggs! Easy peasy!

Sundance Quilt

This week Jenny uses Moda’s Cupcake Mix® Recipe 4 to whip up an easy batch of tiny blocks just as sweet as real cupcakes. Click HERE to learn how to make this pretty quilt!

Sundance Quilt

Watch the Latest Tutorial from Missouri Star Quilt Co!