Quick & Easy Quilt As You Go Gift Ideas

Quilt as you go” is a fun technique in which you piece and quilt all at once so by the time you are finished with your top, all you have to do is bind, and voila… your done! It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3.

Quilt as you go gives you way to focus on each piece individually and not worry about the entirety of a project. These are perfect for the holidays when you may have to come up with quick gift ideas!

Watch Jenny in this tutorial as she shows you how to quilt as you go with any block! (And check out this throwback tutorial for even more helpful quilt as you go tips!)

Here are some great “Quilt As You Go” gift ideas:

  1. Start with preprinted batting
  2. Sew on the lines
  3. Enjoy your finished project!

Quilted totes make special gifts! Try this Sophie Tote or the super cute, Alexandria Tote! Use the featured Lemon Fresh collection or browse our
themed collections to personalize your gift! (Watch Misty make the Sophie Tote and see how quick it is!)


Coming up with the right gift for a family, friend, or workplace gift exchange can be frustrating. A homemade stocking is a good way to give something fun, from the heart, and it’s super quick and easy!

Don’t forget to fill it up with sweet goodies and everyone will be wishing for a Secret Santa like you!

Find their favorite prints and cut six – 1/2 yard pieces for this project! Don’t forget 1 yard of binding and 1 1/2 yards of backing!


Is their a baby in the family celebrating their first Christmas this year? Homemade baby bibs are a good way to celebrate and this batting kit makes it so easy!
You’ll also need
1/4 yard EACH of 5 fabrics
1/2 backing
1/2 binding

You’re sure to find the most adorable prints in our Kids & Baby section or use cutesy Christmas fabrics!


Do you use the Quilt As You Go technique?
Show us some of your quilt as you go projects below?

A Look Inside BLOCK Magazine: Winter 2019

“Great stories happen to those who can tell them.” -Ira Glass

After the winter holidays, I like to write down the moments that made me smile. Like the care that went into a handmade gift from a grandchild, the friendly chatter around the family dinner table, and the sweet older lady who talked to me at the post office. Every day there’s something to remind me there is good in this world. These little moments make up each day and when I stop to appreciate them, it changes my perspective, and ultimately, my life.

Our lives are composed of small moments that make up our stories. Taking the time to recognize them and record them creates a narrative that connects generations. And quilting is another way of telling our stories. Each quilt begins with a moment of inspiration, a desire to create something beautiful and show we care. When a friend or a family member needs some extra love, I may not always know the perfect thing to do or say, but I know of at least one way I can help. Quilts communicate love beyond words.

If you’re ever wondering if your stories matter, take heart! They matter more than you’ll ever know. For the first time ever, this issue of BLOCK features stories from you, our readers. Thank you so much for sharing them with us! It has been a joy to read over them. We sincerely wish we could include them all. If you would like to submit your story for a future issue, we’d love to listen. Send it to us at blockstories@missouriquiltco.com. Here’s to a Merry Christmas, a Happy New Year and many more stories to come.

Love,
Jenny


Behind the Scenes of BLOCK Magazine Volume 6 Issue 6

One of the photographs in this issue was taken above Missouri Star’s Penney’s Quilt Shop. It’s a spectacular space that has yet to be renovated and still holds the heart of Hamilton’s history within its walls. To keep to the authenticity, we modeled two of our very own employees: Joe Morgan, our amazing carpenter who has played a huge role in the renovations of most all our buildings and his sweet wife, Elizabeth, who can usually be found in our Kids & Baby shop.

During this shoot, the photography team got to work closely with Jenny and some of her family. Jenny and Ron posed together for a snugly shot while her son, Alan, his wife, Drea, and their sweet baby Porter modeled for a cookie exchange photo-shoot. Jenny’s grandson, Porter, loved being the center of attention and put on a great little show!

Get a sneak peek of what’s inside this issue…

Here are just a few quilts you’ll find in our next issue, featured in different colors and new collections! Within this magazine, you’ll find that each quilt pattern is tied to an inspiring story and beautiful photography!

Each issue includes 10 patterns plus a few of Jenny’s special projects! That’s over $50 worth of information all packed into each bi-monthly issue of BLOCK Magazine for just $7.99! ($9.99 bi-monthly for Canadian subscriptions)

Subscribe by November 25, 2019 to get this issue in December!

SUBSCRIBE TO BLOCK MAGAZINE TODAY!

While we’re buttoning up the odds and ends of this next issue, would you help us choose the front cover? We just love them all!

Click HERE to send in your vote! Thank you!

Already subscribed to BLOCK Magazine?
Tell us what you love most in the comments below!

Calico Star Quilt

According to science, you are a terrible multitasker. (We all are!) Studies show it’s best to focus on just one task. Until today, that is.

Today Jenny will show you how to whip up 3 different blocks all at once: Square in a square, broken dishes, and chevron. (The secret? They’re all made from half-square triangles! Easy peasy!) Click HERE to watch the tutorial!

Watch the Latest Tutorial from Missouri Star Quilt Co!

Meet Missouri Star Academy Instructor, Patsy Thompson

Our newest Missouri Star Academy instructor is Patsy Thompson of Patsy Thompson Designs. She is an expert in free motion quilting using rulers. As you scroll through this post, you will find some of the most beautiful quilts quilted and designed by Patsy! Get to know her a bit more and fall in love with ruler-work quilting in her class, Beginning Free Motion Quilting with Rulers!

When did you first give machine quilting a try?

In the year 2000. I had been a hand quilter for over 20 years, and when I would see machine quilted quilts at shows, I thought of them as “cheater quilts.” I figured I could quickly learn to machine quilt, and I was so, SO WRONG!! It was very hard and took me a couple years of what felt like endless practice! I am very glad I didn’t give up, though, because I love to free motion quilt!

When you started, did you first use rulers or are they something you came to use later on?

Oh, gosh, no! I had been free motion quilting for many years before I tried rulers. Back when I did start, there were no ruler feet for home machines and we had to improvise. Nowadays, the market is very much geared to the home quilter and there’s a ruler foot for pretty much any machine that’s available.

What advice do you have for someone just starting out with ruler work?

Get ready to have fun! It will feel very strange/awkward when you first start out, but stick with it and soon it will feel completely normal to be holding/moving the quilt and a ruler simultaneously. The learning curve for ruler work is much faster than for regular free motion quilting, so it’s worth giving ruler work a shot even if you’re a beginner free motion quilter.

What advice do you have for someone who just started machine quilting?

I know that no one wants to hear these words, but keep practicing, then practice some more. It’s all about putting in the time. I would also start with much smaller projects. There are really two very different skills you need to free motion quilt:

  1.  You need to learn how to control the quilt sandwich underneath the needle to create an appealing design.  This requires you learning how to move the quilt from point A to point B to point C to create the design, and also how to do the “dance” between how quickly you move the quilt across the machine bed and how fast you run the foot pedal.  This set of skills is best learned on small quilt sandwiches.
  2. You need to learn to handle the quilt from the standpoint of a mechanical engineer.  A quilt is big and bulky and has a weightiness that will always be pulling against you until you learn how to position it to avoid drag.  When you’re a sit-down quilter on a home sewing machine, you also have that small harp space to contend with.  I don’t think about any of these issues anymore because it is second nature to me how to position/manipulate the quilt as I work, but when you’re first learning to free motion quilt, you’ll really need to focus on how to overcome these challenges.  

Do you have an all-time favorite quilt that you have quilted?

I have two all time favorites. Both of them have some hand-dyed cotton sateen fabrics in them, and there is something about those luscious colors that thrills me as I am quilting! They both have a lot of ruler work quilting, and also lots of feathers, so they each have many of my favorite parts of quilting.

Where do you look for inspiration in your work?

Pretty much everywhere.  I am very affected by color, especially rich, saturated colors, so I generally find myself stimulated by colors I see in everyday things.  I also am aware of combinations of colors (i.e. colors next to one another) that I find pleasing.  Those combinations will frequently find their way into quilts!

How long have you been teaching classes and what do you enjoy most about sharing your skills?

I taught my first class in early 2002. A friend of mine talked me into it and I remember being SO nervous driving to the class, questioning how I let myself get talked into doing it, wishing I could somehow get out of it. By the end of the class, I felt so exhilarated by seeing all these students learning how to free motion quilt, that I never questioned teaching again.  The best part of teaching is seeing a student realize that he/she can “do it.” There is nothing like the thrill of being a part of that spark! 

What are the must have tools for ruler work you always have on hand?

A ruler foot that fits your machine, machine quilting rulers/templates, and either a plexiglass extension table for your machine or the ability to sink the machine so it is flush with the quilting surface. You’ll also want marking tools (to mark your starting/stopping points), a seam ripper, and I like having a short ruler (6-8 inches long) for any measuring/marking that need to be done on the fly.

What is your favorite ruler to use/design to make when machine quilting?

Arc rulers, for sure! You can make so many different types of designs with arc rulers, and the more curves you have at your disposal, the better. Arcs RULE!!

START MACHINE QUILTING WITH RULERS

What is your favorite machine quilting design?
Show us in the comments!

Square Knot Quilt

Square Knot Quilt

When it comes to tying knots, I’m all thumbs! I never can remember which end goes over and which goes around. Frankly, it’s no small miracle my shoes stay laced! 

Square Knot Quilt

But this week’s Square Knot quilt is so quick and easy, you’ll be whipping up those “knots” faster than a well-seasoned sailor! Click HERE to watch the tutorial!

Square Knot Quilt
Watch the Latest Tutorial from Missouri Star Quilt Co!

Forget-Me-Not Quilt

Forget-Me-Not Quilt

Chances are, someone you love has been affected by Alzheimer’s disease. With 6 million patients and 16 million caregivers worldwide, it’s a heartache that is much too common.

Forget-Me-Not Quilt

November is Alzheimer’s Awareness Month. Jenny created the beautiful Forget Me Not quilt in memory of her dear mother-in-law who was lost to Alzheimer’s 19 years ago. This appliqué project is made easy with our brand new Missouri Star Petal template. Click HERE to watch the tutorial.

Forget-Me-Not Quilt
Watch the Latest Tutorial from Missouri Star Quilt Co!