Building Blocks: Learning Quilting Basics

A sewing machine in action from BLOCK Magazine Volume 7 Issue 3.

If you’re interested in learning about the basics of quilting, then you’re in the right place! 

Getting started with something new is usually the hardest part. Quilting can be a laborious process — it requires many steps that can seem really overwhelming when you’re new to it all! Many beginner quilters can get stuck when thinking about piecing together their first blocks, but we’re here to help! Today we’re going to be talking about the steps before you start piecing. A good foundation is the key to success, so before you dive in and start stitching up your first creation, let’s learn about the very first steps in your quilting journey!

Jenny Doan always says “finished is better than perfect” and we can’t agree more! No one will notice if you lost a point or if you had to add back fabric with an extra seam after a cutting mistake or if you had to rip out the stitches in your block one too many times with your handy seam ripper (we’ll learn more about this tool soon!). Finishing a quilt or project is a huge accomplishment and you should never let your fear of imperfection get in the way of creating! So, let’s start with the basics and build our foundation and you’ll be sewing confidently in no time!

Fabrics

Fabric comes in all kinds of shapes, colors, cuts and styles. Photo from BLOCK Magazine Volume 7 Issue 1.

When it comes to buying fabric for your first quilt, pre-cuts are a good place to start! They come ready to go in various sizes in bundles of fabrics that coordinate with one another. If you haven’t had the chance, you can learn more about pre-cuts in our previous Building Blocks blog post. If you aren’t ready to take the leap into buying pre-cuts yet or you have other fabrics in mind for your project, have no worries! Virtually any fabric can be used for a quilting project.

The Memory quilt, for example, utilizes old neckties and shirts to create a quilt to honor a dear one’s existence. These materials are not designed for quilting projects, but with a little creative energy and ingenuity they come together to make a fantastic project that makes a truly powerful gift to honor the memory of a loved one. Old denim jeans, fabric scraps, recycled materials, t-shirts, and more can be materials used in your projects! So the next time you open your closet, keep in mind what you can repurpose to add a unique and modern touch to your quilting project.

You have many options for materials to use in your projects, but keep in mind that some materials are trickier to use than others. If you are just entering the world of sewing, we recommend choosing a material that is 100% cotton!

Cutting & Measuring

A selection of Rotary Cutters in various shapes and sizes on top of a gridded cutting mat.

Now that you are getting comfortable with choosing fabric and learning about all the choices you have, let’s talk cutting that fabric! The old adage “measure twice, cut once” has never been so pertinent. In many projects, the fabric measurements are very important to get right, so that the rest of the work goes by smoothly! Quilting can be a precise art form, so it’s best to get used to measuring out your fabrics and cutting as accurately as possible in order to get the best results. There are a few handy tools that can aid in making this process the easiest it can be!

You’ll need a rotary cutter, a cutting mat, and a ruler. Scissors are very helpful in the sewing process, but when cutting up fabric as accurately and quickly as possible, rotary cutters are our go to — especially when paired with a gridded cutting mat. These mats come blocked out in one inch squares to assist in your fabric measuring and cutting! By learning how to sandwich your fabric between your mat and ruler and using the marked, premeasured guides on those tools, you can soon become comfortable with using your rotary cutter and making as accurate cuts as you can! It takes practice, so don’t be discouraged if you make mistakes along the way. No one is a master in the beginning!

Pressing

Irons and pressing mats come in a variety of styles and designs.

The last item that we suggest getting familiar with that will help in the quilting process is something that you likely already have in your house – an iron! Irons are an integral part of the entire quilting process — they are with us almost every step of the way! You may already be comfortable with the iron you have at home and if you are not, don’t fret! They usually are pretty quick to learn and may just take a little studying and practice to find the settings that work best for you. Ironing makes many steps of the quilting process easier and soon you’ll figure out how much or how little ironing you like to do during your quilting process! Everyone is a little different — some people utilize the steam feature on their iron often, some people iron every little piece, and some iron rarely. It’s all personal and a part of the learning process!

Remember to always iron on a safe surface — an ironing board is great if you have one, but if you want a space closer to your sewing area, you can always purchase an ironing mat or even make your own! You’ll be ready to press in no time and create beautiful smooth fabric that’s ready for the next step, piecing!

In our next segment, we will be talking all about piecing. Take this time to familiarize yourself with your quilting tools and measuring and cutting fabric. Remember, these basic steps, although simple, will make all the difference when creating your first quilt project. We can’t wait to see what you create!

A Brief and Incomplete History of Quilting

Fabric stored and organized for the purpose of quilting.

Quilting has a long and storied history stretching back as far as ancient Egypt, piecing together a timeline of humanity from which we draw our crafting skills. While the quilting we know and love today is worlds different from the functional quilting of our past, it still holds a unique place in our hearts and in our history. For generations we’ve warmed ourselves and our families beneath quilts. They’ve been there to protect us, remind us of our past, and comfort us in difficult times.

While it’s not possible to capture the complete history of quilting in one attempt (and we’re by no means experts on the subject!), this guide can serve as a very broad overview of our craft—a guide to remind you that with every stitch you create, you create a stitch within the fabric of time. Many cultures in our world have used quilting as a means to document their history, survive harsh environments, and bring comfort during times of strife. For generations, careful hands have passed down their gifts until they have finally reached us and it is now in our hands to continue the quilting journey. Looking back on our past may be important, but it’s the quilters of today that will keep our craft alive.

Early Beginnings

Pictorial Quilt, 1795. Linen, multicolored thread, 103 1/4 x 91 in. (262.3 x 231.1 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, 41.285

Quilting can be traced back to many ancient civilizations within China, North Africa, and the Middle East. An ivory carving depicting the Pharaoh of the Egyptian First Dynasty wearing a quilted mantle, now housed in the British Museum, is recognized as the first known evidence of quilting. During these time periods, the concept of quilting wasn’t all that different than how we see it today. Many original quilted goods were created out of necessity. Many layers “sandwiched” together created a warmer, thicker product that was handy in many different uses. Clothing to both warm and protect the wearer (even to pad the armor of knights!) and bedding was made by quilting different layers of fabric together.

Medieval Europe offers some of the clearest glimpses into the early history of quilting. As with many creative processes, quilting was utilized as a method of storytelling as well as a functional necessity. As cinema has given us the opportunity to visualize a story, early quilts allowed the creator to embellish and decorate with stories from both written and oral traditions. Two of the earliest known decorative quilts are from the 14th century and both capture the legend of Tristan and Isolde. Quilts throughout history have been used and created as both functional vessels of warmth and beautiful works of art.

Quilting Comes to America

The Stars and Stripes quilt from the Missouri Star Quilt Company.

Practicality was key for early American settlers. In a new environment, isolated from the known world, quilts found their purpose in the form of warmth. Most of the early American quilts were not focused on aesthetics, but rather were created from the limited resources available. They used whatever materials they had on hand, recycling outgrown and damaged clothing (and at times, even other, older quilts!) into new quilts. These quilts were purely for functionality and keeping warm.

If protection from the elements wasn’t beneficial enough, quilting developed another function in early colonial America—social interaction. As we all know, quilting is no easy task. The laborious process is well-loved by many, but before modern revolutions such as pre-cut materials and sewing machines, quilts had to be made entirely by hand.

Pictorial Quilt, ca. 1840. Cotton, cotton thread, 85 1/2 x 67 3/4 in. (217.2 x 172.1 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mrs. Franklin Chace, Gavin Ashworth photograph

The quilting bee, a social gathering where women came together to socialize and quilt, was a way for many early settlers in America to not only continue working on their projects, but  interact with their community and have fun while sewing during the long process! For many, quilting was a relaxing activity and something to look forward to, especially when able to gather with their fellow quilters. These social gatherings, along with sewing at home, allowed the opportunity for quilting to be passed on as a generational skill. Mothers would teach daughters the basic stitches and then in turn, would pass those skills on to their children, creating a lifetime of heirloom quilts with nostalgic memories layered within the fabric. Quilting became a popular activity for major life events in which entire quilts were completed within a day due to limited time with neighbors whom early settlers might have only seen a few times a year. The Victoria and Albert museum states, “particularly in north America … there is a tradition of a quilt-making ‘bee’ for a girl about to get married, with the aim of stitching a whole quilt in one day”.

These gatherings and the first boom in quilt popularity gave birth to many of the vintage blocks that we still use and gain inspiration from today. Early American crafters, much like the earliest quilters, told stories with their projects by sewing the world around them. The pinwheel block utilizes motion, demonstrating the prairie winds of which they traveled. Star blocks captured the night sky and the importance of light in a vast, unexplored wilderness. These blocks have been passed down for centuries until they became the staples of quilting that we know and love today.

Modern Quilting

The Sunset Cabin quilt from ModBLOCK Volume 5.

Today, quilting is more accessible than it ever has been. We live in a world of pre-cut fabrics available at the press of a button and instructional videos that can be watched online from the convenience of our homes. Quilting isn’t entirely a necessity as it once was, we can instead use it as a creative outlet and pastime.

The world of quilting continues to change as the world we live in evolves. Modern quilting utilizing bold color designs and prints, once an impossibility due to limited technology and supplies, has brightened the artform in unimaginable ways. Geometric and fractal quilting are growing in popularity as a new generation of quilters piece their first works, many of which have learned their craft online rather than through the traditional in-person learning process. As the world changes, so does quilting. Regardless of what the quilts of tomorrow look like, we can remember where they came from and keep their memory alive within our patchwork. So pick up an old pattern today and try something new— replace the background with a bold, modern color or add some abstract designs into your block but remember that with every stitch, you’re continuing the timeline of quilt history.

Thimble Container Cactus Shaped Pincushion

The Missouri Star Thimble Container Cactus Pincushion from Missouri Star LIVE!
The Cactus Pincushion from Missouri Star Live displayed in a terracotta pot.

Long gone are the days of your grandmother’s red tomato pincushion! In the latest installment of Missouri Star LIVE, Courtenay demonstrates how to make a unique cactus shaped pincushion that will not only add a modern elegance to your sewing room, but will keep all of your pins safely tucked away for future use. Whether you’re “planting” your cactus pincushion in a traditional terracotta pot, or celebrating your love for Missouri Star by using a Thimble Container, this handy project is a must-have addition to your sewing studio.

PROJECT SUPPLIES

• (1) 9″ x 12″ green felt square
• Felt scrap for blossom—approximately 1½” x 3″
Fiberfill
Missouri Star Thimble Container or terracotta pot
• 3½” – 4″ styrofoam cube
• Gorilla Glue or similar glue for styrofoam
Wonder clips or binder clips—optional
• Aquarium rock—optional

The Missouri Star Thimble Container Cactus Pincushion from Missouri Star LIVE!
Add your pincushion to a Missouri Star Thimble Container and share your love of Missouri Star!

CUTTING

  1. Use the petal template to trace and cut 6 petal shapes from the green felt.
  2. Cut out the paper cactus blossom template. Use the template to trace and cut 2 cactus blossoms from the accent felt scrap. Set these aside for the moment.
    • Hint: Because you are sewing through layers of felt, you may need to change your needle to a larger size and sew slowly to ensure even stitching.
  3. Lay 1 petal shape atop another, right sides out. Using a medium zigzag stitch, sew around the curved edges, leaving the bottom edge open. Repeat with pairs of the remaining petal shapes to make 3 units.
  4. On only 1 of the sewn units, measure 1¾” from the widest point of the curved edges and mark a vertical center line.
  5. Stack the 3 sewn units, aligning the edges, with the marked unit on top. Use Wonder Clips, binder clips, or pin as needed to hold the stack together. Sew the 3 units together along the marked center line, backstitching at the beginning and end.
The Missouri Star Thimble Container Cactus Pincushion from Missouri Star LIVE!
Pin a fabric flower to the top of your Cactus Pincushion for a beautiful final touch.

FINISHING

  1. Stuff each of the 6 tubes you just created with fiberfill.
    • Hint: The eraser end of a pencil or small dowel comes in handy to stuff the skinny tubes (Don’t forget you may find a wooden rod in your Poly-fil bag!).
  2. Lay 1 cactus blossom atop the other at a 45° angle so that the ends of all 8 petals are visible.
  3. Sew the blossoms together by hand, slightly gathering the top petals so they have 3 dimensions.
  4. Sew the cactus blossom to the top of the cactus.
  5. Cut the styrofoam cube as needed to fit inside the thimble container. Use the glue to adhere the sytrofoam to the inside of the pot. Use additional glue to adhere the cactus to the top of the styrofoam. You can fill the pot around the styrofoam with aquarium rock or even glue some rocks around the base of the cactus to finish “planting” your cactus.
  6. Stick in some of your favorite pins and your cactus pincushion is sure to prickle your fancy!
Watch the Latest Tutorial from Missouri Star Quilt Co!

Needing some more help? Download our Free Printable Pattern or Join Missouri Star’s very own Courtenay Hughes as she demonstrates how to create this adorable, quick and easy project on the replay of Missouri Star LIVE!

Have Yourself a Crafty Christmas – 6 Last Minute Christmas Gift Ideas

Christmas from the Main Shop of the Missouri Star Quilt Co. in Hamilton Missouri.
Christmas time at Missouri Star Quilt Co. Main Shop in Hamilton, Missouri.

Ready or not – Christmas is coming! The holidays are such a special time for crafters because it lets us share our creative gifts with friends, family and those in need. There is no better time of year to warm the hearts of your near and dear with a homemade gift (that just happens to show off your crafty abilities).

Shorter days and holiday activities can make it feel like there isn’t time to make handmade gifts (it’s already December!). While tackling a brand new quilt may be daunting, there are many festive projects that can be created quickly and bring cheer to those who receive them. And in a year like 2020, when social distancing means breaking time-honored traditions for the safety of our friends and loved ones, there is no better gift than something made from the heart and by your own hands.

Christmas Stocking

Quilted Christmas Stockings from the Missouri Star Quilt Co.
Create an awe-inspiring mantle display by gifting a Christmas Stocking that can be used for years to come!

What is more classic than a Christmas Stocking hung by the chimney with care? This holiday gift has an extra bonus – it’s already gift wrapped! Stitch up a quick and easy Quilted Christmas Stocking using 2.5 inch strips of precut fabric, and then fill them with all kinds of handy quilting notions, Missouri Star Gift Cards and sewing thread for a merry gift to the maker in your life! Even if sewing isn’t your recipient’s passion, that beautiful, handmade holiday stocking will become a part of their traditions every year.

For this quick and easy project, pick a festive fabric (we like Winter’s Grandeur 8 Holiday Metallic Roll Up by Liza Bea Studio for Robert Kaufman). These red, green and gold 2.5″ strips of quilting fabric sparkle with poinsettias, snowflakes, cardinals and plaid, adding charm to each square of your stocking. Cuff the top in a lovely plaid for a magical winter wonder.

Watch the Free Quilting Tutorial >

Shop Precut Fabric Here >

One Yard Apron

The One Yard Apron from the Missouri Star Quilt Co.
Misty relaxes in the kitchen in a cute red-checkered One Yard Apron.

A lot of the Christmas season takes place in the kitchen with holiday baking, festive family dinners and plenty of hot cocoa! The incredibly simple One Yard Apron is the perfect gift for the hostess in your life. It’s such a fast, easy project, you can use it to teach the kiddos in your life the joy of handmade gifts – with only one yard of your favorite fabric!

If you want to follow Misty’s lead, use Cozy Critters – Buffalo Check Red Yardage by M.J. Merrill for Wilmington Prints. This black and red plaid check fabric ties in well for the holidays, but is perfect for any home chef year round! If your stash needs to be reduced, just use ANY yard of fabric you have on hand!

Watch the Missouri Star LIVE Replay >

Shop Fabric by the Yard Here >

Mug Rug

Create a Mug Rug with the Missouri Star Quilt Co.
Basics can be beautiful, like this easy holiday Mug Rug.

This little Mug Rug is such an easy project, you’ll probably make a few for yourself along the way! Using a pack of 5″ squares of precut fabric, these cute table-savers keep your Christmas cocoa cozy. As a holiday bonus – this fast little gift is perfect for beginners!

When selecting your fabric, it’s not just about snowmen and snowflakes. Keep in mind the mug rug will serve as a protective layer for a hot drink, and also might soak up spilled drinks after enthusiastic cookie dunking! Avoid light fabrics that stain and try a thick flannel fabric such as a Woolies Flannel Holiday Warmth Charm Pack by Bonnie Sullivan for Maywood Studio. If you’re feeling ambitious, swap out the charm pack for a Layer Cake (10″ square of precut fabric) and create gorgeous table protectors for your holiday feast!

Watch the Free Quilting Tutorial >

Shop Precut Fabric Here >

Tree Skirt

Create a Christmas Tree Skirt with the Missouri Star Quilt Co.
Light up their Christmas with a quilted tree skirt they can use every year.

More so than all the other decorations, the Christmas tree is always the focal point of the holiday season – that’s where the presents go! Gifts get the perfect showcase when arranged on a quilted fabric Tree Skirt. This little quilt for your tree comes together simply with 5″ squares of precut quilting fabric.

The fabric is what makes this project shine! Of course you can design the exact skirt to suit your holiday style if you want to whip this up for yourself. If you’re making it for someone else, consider solids or batiks so it’s more likely to match their decorations. Season’s Splendor Batiks Stamps by Kathy Engle for Island Batik is a perfect combination of festive Christmas colors and classic motifs.

Watch the Free Quilting Tutorial >

Shop Precut Fabric Here >

Easy Zipper Pouch

The Easy Zipper Pouch from Missouri Star Quilt Co.
With festive new MSQC Fancy Zips, the Easy Zipper Pouch from Missouri Star Live is useful gift for anyone!

Give the gift of functionality this Christmas with the Easy Zipper Pouch, featuring the all new Missouri Star Fancy Zips! In this Missouri Star LIVE, Jenny and Misty teach us how to stitch up this extremely useful project that, with a little festive fabric from your stash, makes a thoughtful last minute gift idea. There are so many uses for this handy little bag. Add some vinyl to the interior for a cosmetics bag or add some batting for a notion holder!

You’ll need cut yardage no smaller than 14″ in length (the necessary length to add a Missouri Star Fancy Zip). For a festive holiday bag, select a beautiful cut of Christmas fabric by the yard. If you need a little extra help with this project, you can purchase a digital download of the Easy Zipper Pouch pattern so that you can start stitching immediately!

Watch the LIVE Replay >

Shop Fabric by the Yard Here>

Missouri Star Gift Card

The Missouri Star Gift Card and holiday gift card holder.
MSQC gift cards in festive gift card holders offer holiday cheer to your favorite maker!

If it’s the night before Christmas and you’re still having doubts, keep it simple and crafty and gift card it out! If there’s a quilter on your list who has it all, give them the gift of choice with a Missouri Star gift card! Available in both physical gift cards (definitely consider a holiday gift card holder for big MSQC fans!) and digital gift cards (that can be emailed same day), this last minute gift idea will save Christmas when your crafting time has run out.

Shop Missouri Star Gift Cards Here >

Year in Review – A look at 2020 with Missouri Star

As we look back over the past twelve months, we’re simply amazed! We were touched by the love from our followers, the support of our customers, the kind hearts of each and every one of our hardworking team members, and the selflessness within the quilting community. Despite this challenging year, we’ve been able to accomplish so much together.

Thanks to you, Missouri Star is celebrating yet another great year of quilting! It’s been filled with inspiring stories from quilters all around the world, brand new products created with you in mind, exciting tutorials that have inspired many, and some unforgettable, first-ever online events!

Let’s celebrate the end of 2020 by looking back on some of the good things that happened this year:

FACE MASKS

Wow, quilters! Thanks to your passion for sewing and your big hearts, you were able to play an important part in the fight against a global pandemic. Since March 1st of 2020 – 56,973 of you have purchased fabric from Missouri Star specifically to create masks to help keep your communities safe! That is amazing – thank you!

In the comments below, tell us about all the ways you were able to help your community this year! Here’s what we did for ours:

  • Close to 6,500 yards of fabric has been donated to area groups and non-profit organizations who are making masks for healthcare workers
  • We have donated 350 N95 masks to the local regional hospital and 2 local businesses who provide food delivery and cleaning services for our community
  • We provided tutorials for creating masks to keep you safe
DIY Face Masks

TOP TUTORIALS

Morning Star Quilt Tutorial

MORNING STAR

Jenny Doan demonstrates how to make a beautiful Morning Star quilt using 2.5″ strips of precut fabric (jelly rolls). This pretty star pattern was designed by Tara Faughnan for ModBLOCK. It’s an easier version of the old block known as Morning Star, Lone Star, or Star of the East.

WATCH TUTORIAL >

Jenny's Easy Carpenters Star

JENNY’S EASY CARPENTER STAR

Jenny teaches us how to make an easy version of the classic Carpenter Star using 10″ squares of precut fabric (layer cakes). This traditional quilt is often made with squares and diamonds, but Jenny uses half square triangles because they’re so quick and easy and don’t require y-seams!

WATCH TUTORIAL >


TOP MISSOURI STAR LIVES

Our First BLOCK Party

Together we celebrated BLOCK Magazine Vol. 7 Issue 4 with our very first BLOCK Party hosted by Jenny and Natalie!

WATCH BLOCK PARTY >

Zig Zag Placemat and Napkin Kit LIVE

Placemat & Napkin Kit

Back in January, you let us know loud and clear that you loved this fun tutorial. These pretty placemats make a sweet addition to your table!

WATCH TUTORIAL>


NEW SERIES! THE FINAL STITCH

We introduced a brand new tutorial series by Jenny’s daughter, Natalie, that’s a fresh take on finishing quilts. Follow along with her and get beautiful results every time!

SUBSCRIBE NOW >


THE NEW, IMPROVED BLOCK MAGAZINE!

BLOCK MAGAZINE

This year, the BLOCK team released a brand new design to BLOCK Magazine. New cover look, more educational content, more stories from our readers, and more!

Digital version of BLOCK Magazine

DIGITAL BLOCK

Each issue of BLOCK comes with an interactive digital version! It’s kind of hard to wait for each issue to arrive, so we wanted to give you an early treat.

SEE HOW IT WORKS >

Best of BLOCK

Best of BLOCK

We recently released our first-ever special edition of BLOCK Magazine. It’s a compilation of the last seven years with 25 of our favorite patterns and over 200 pages of quilt-y fun!

PRE-ORDER TODAY! >


SEW-ALONGS

This year we introduced two new sew-alongs to make quilting easier than ever. As you follow along, month by month or piece by piece, your quilt will take shape! By the end, you’ll have a lovely quilt that’s handmade by you!

ALL STARS BLOCK OF THE MONTH >

Jenny released her first-ever block of the month in February of this year. It contains 11 of her favorite star blocks from 11 of her favorite tutorials! Become an all star and join in on the fun in her Facebook group! >

INTO THE WOODS QUILT PATTERN >

Inspired by her children’s love for the outdoors and their adventurous personalities, Misty created a gorgeous quilt designed with them in mind! Get the pattern and join her Facebook group >


BIRTHDAY BASH – AT HOME

This year we celebrated Birthday Bash like never before! Thank you for stitching along with us for 12 wonderful years and joining the party from the comfort of home. It was an experience we’ll never forget! Relive the Best Moments >


DONATIONS

Thanks to your support, we were able to donate $10,000 to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation! All through October, we fought breast cancer one stitch at a time by shopping pink! Learn more >

Project Linus is an organization that provides love, security, and comfort to children who are seriously ill, traumatized, or are just simply in need of a handmade blanket. As one of the many ways we’re trying to spread kindness this year, we chose Project Linus to receive a $5,000 donation from us at Missouri Star. Learn more >

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT TO MAKES THESE DONATIONS POSSIBLE!


GIVE LOVE

You are one of our biggest sources of inspiration! Although it’s been a tough year for many, you continue to show optimism and spread joy through all the kind things you do.

“I’m 11 years old. My Grandma taught me to sew. This is my very first quilt!  I used 10 squares. I had it quilted at Missouri Star. I Love my Grandma!  It was the best day. Ever. (It was my idea to have her embroider a Secret Santa for people to find.)”
– the grandson of Laurie S.

“For several years now I have been donating quilts to the Linus Project.  I get to be very creative and I try to think about the kids that will receive a quilt and make them more than just something to snuggle under…  I average about 10 quilts a year.”
– Wendy G.

“We are a small group of ladies that support needs of nursing homes… We have made over 60 fidget pads, over 30 clothing protectors, over 20 baby dolls with blankets, crocheted over 40 caps, covered over 40 Small pillows, for wheel chairs, 100s of masks… Love these ladies and their servant hearts!”
– Nancy D.

“I volunteer with the “Helping Hands” sewing group my church.  We make various items from donated fabric and yarn… lap quilts for first responders to give to children in trauma situations, bed quilts and kitchen goods for our missionary families, quilts for orphanages, and window curtains for loft houses our church builds for homeless families.”
– Cindy M.

Quilters, thank you for being an inspiration to us and the world. We look forward to seeing all the great things you’ll continue to do in the new year!

Happy quilting!