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A Hand Sewn Independence Day!

A Hand Sewn Independence Day!

Primitive Patriotic Flags

Hi all! This is Hillary and I’m excited to share a little 4th of July project with you! I love Independence Day! Ever since I was a kid summer time and freedom go hand in hand! I remember sunny Independence days with special programs and fireworks for the whole family! I still make my moms flag cheesecake every year and, of course, decorating is half the fun of any holiday 🙂 Strangely enough  I only have a few 4th of July decorations, so, this year I upped the freedom feeling in our house by making a bouquet of primitive flags!

I love them and they’re so easy! To make one of these little freedom flyers you’ll need –

Muslin – 1 – 6″ x 9″ piece

2 – 1/2″ x 5″ – 6″ long strips

Red Fabric – 4 – 3/4″ x 9″ strips or 1 WOF strip a few inches wide if tearing the fabric (I tore mine instead of cutting for a more primitive look)

Stars on Blue background Fabric – 1 – 3″ x 4″  piece

1 stick – 2 – 4 ft tall

Clear spray paint

Neutral colored embroidery floss or thick thread and a needle with a large enough eye to thread the floss through

 

1) Start with your sticks I took a wire brush to mine and otherwise scrubbed, rubbed, and flaked off anything I could till everything left was pretty stuck to it. Then I took them into the front yard and sprayed them down with clear spray paint so that anything left would have a coat of sealant on it and it wouldn’t end up all over my floor.

2) Then cut your fabric. You only need one Width of Fabric strip to get your 4 – 9″ pieces and to tear the red strips simply make a couple little snips 3/4″ apart along one edge of the red fabric and pull them apart. It will probably look like it’s tearing crooked but it’s tearing right along the grain, trust me and tear down the fabric on the second snip and you’ll have a strip of fabric 3/4″ wide torn on both edges. Easy and done!

There will probably be lots of hanging strings from the sides just pull them off and toss them.  Iron the edges flat and trim off 4 – 9″ long sections. You should be able to get 5 pieces from each strip. Just set aside the 5th one you can use it for extra flags later!

3) It’s time to put your flag together. Pin your red stripes to the 6″ x 9″ Muslin rectangle. Using the floss and a big running stitch sew down the center of each stripe. My stitches have approximately 1/4″ – 3/8″ showing and in between. So, Big!Use basic knots on the back of the flag to start and end each row.

4) After the stripes are attached, line up your stars fabric in the corner and stitch it down in the same manner, only this time you sew all around the edge.

5) Make 2 small cuts in the top corner of the blue stars and in the muslin between the bottom two red stripes. Thread your muslin strips half way through.

6) Last step is to tea dye them! OK I didn’t actually use tea. All I had was peppermint and I didn’t know if that would work or how long it would take because it’s not as strong as a standard tea. (I think. really I just didn’t know) So after browsing the Internet I found that Tan Rit dye is another good option to achieve the same affect. I didn’t follow the box instructions so I’ll tell you what I did just in case it helps you.

I filled the bottom of my clean sink with super hot tap water. Only a couple inches deep. Then I poured in half the bottle of dye and maybe half a cup of salt. This is a stronger solution than they suggest for dying things, but I didn’t want to end up with a solid tan color so I made it strong. 🙂

Then I wet the flags with hot water and wadded them up before putting them in the dye. The wadded material helped give it a mottled color when they came out. I didn’t have to leave them in long. The darkest flags were in just over a minute and the lightest were just under a minute.

Take them out of the dye. Rinse them and dry them.

7) Last step tie them to a stick using the little muslin strips. That’s it!

 

I love this! Such a simple project and several together make a big impact! Happy 4th of July!

 

Hillary from the Missouri Star Quilt Company

DIY Fabric Flag Holiday Decoration with Easy Gathering Technique – Step by Step Tutorial

DIY Fabric Flag Holiday Decoration with Easy Gathering Technique – Step by Step Tutorial

During a recent Facebook Live video, we taught a simple technique for gathering fabric. It’s great if you don’t have a lot of time (or patience). You also have the option to find a gathering foot for your machine, but this way is my favorite! We featured a cute project we came up with just in time for Independence Day, so here are the step by step instructions to make it!

Let’s start with the fun part! Pick your fabric! We used fabrics from Freedom by Sweetwater for Moda (Picnic Apple Red Yardage and Bandana Vanilla Yardage) and Lost and Found America by Jen Allyson for Riley Blake Designs (Americana Mini Stars Blue Yardage)

You will need 1/4 yard of Blue, 3/4 yard of white, and 3/4 yard of red.

Additional Supplies:

  • 1 Fat Quarter (I used a neutral color that blends with my fabric choices)
  • Thread (& Sewing Machine)
  • Pins/Wonder Clips
  • Heavy Weight Thread (12wt would work great) or String or Dental Floss or Fishing Line (whatever you prefer)
  • Ruler/Cutting Mat/Rotary Cutter
  • Hot Iron

First, you will start by cutting your fabrics into 3.5″ strips! You need 7 red, 6 white, and 2 blue.

Set aside your red and white strips, and grab the blue strips. Stack the 2 strips and cut them them into thirds, so you get 6 strips that are approximately 3.5″ x 14.3″ (this does not have to be exact).

Take 3 of the red strips and 2 of the white. Trim off 14 inches from each strip. These will be the first 5 strips at the top of the project to show the stars and first 5 stripes. Put them right sides together and sew a 1/4″ seam to attach the 2 fabrics. Press the seams open (as pictured below).

Fold in about 1/4″ on each end and press (as shown).

At this point, you would fold the fabric in half lengthwise and press so the right side is facing out. At that point you will have 5 strips that look like this.

Repeat the previous step with the remaining red and white strips, so that they are all folded lengthwise with the raw edges folded in.

Once all of your strips are prepped like in the photo above, it’s time to add a top stitch to the ends! This will just give you a clean, finished look, so that your raw edges don’t show! Just like you would do a top stitch, get close to the edge and I like to backstitch for some extra security.

This is where the magic begins! It’s time to begin the gathering process! Set your machine to a loose zig zag (these are my settings).

For this next part, you need some kind of string. I used crochet cotton because I had it on hand, but a heavier thread would be great for this, like this Sulky 12 weight thread! You can also use dental floss, fishing line… anything strong that won’t get caught in your zig zag!

Line up the raw edges of your folded strips so that your zig zag won’t come off the edge, and line up the string with the small center marker on your foot. That will help you keep the string nice and centered, so it doesn’t get caught in your zig zag. You do not need to back stitch! Here’s how it should look.

Tip: Think about which side of your strip is the back and which is the front. If you put the zig zag on the back, it will make it harder for the string to accidentally show on your project!

Then, you just pull on one side of the string and gather your fabric together! It’ll twist and turn at first, but don’t let that worry you! That’s what pins and wonder clips are for! 🙂

Once all of your strips are prepped, you can work on the background fabric. I used a neutral colored fat quarter. Square it up to approximately 16×20. Use your iron to double fold each edge (except the top edge) toward the back. That means, fold 1/4″ inch in and press, then fold over and press a 2nd time. Top stitch over the left, right, and bottom edges (left and right sides first, then the bottom) and this will conceal your raw edges. On the top edge, you’re going to fold your edge toward the front side, press, and stitch down the edge. This will be important at the end, once you’ve stitched down all of your gathered strips.

To space your strips evenly, draw straight lines every 1.25″ starting from the bottom of your base fabric.. This is the line you will use to pin your gathered strips to the base fabric.

Tip: Use wonderclips to anchor the strips on each end, then pull your gather string to get even spacing in your gathering. Pin ever 2-4″. Notice that my gathering string is on the underside of the strip to make sure it’s nice and hidden.

To sew your gathered strips down, you will want to set your machine to a smaller/tighter zig zag than the one we used before. I set my stitch length at a 2 and my zig zag width at a 2.5.

Once you get all your strips sewn on, you will want to take the top loop of your background fabric and loop it forward over the raw edge of your top gathered fabric strip. Pin it in place and stitch over it to finish the top edge and create a loop for hanging your finished project!

Tutorial Reboot Featuring Guest Amy Barickman

Tutorial Reboot Featuring Guest Amy Barickman

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

Hi! I’m Amy Barickman, founder of Indygo Junction. I am so excited for this opportunity to reboot one of Jenny’s tutorials. I am lucky enough to be a neighbor of Missouri Star. My hometown, Kansas City, is about an hour from Hamilton. I have enjoyed collaborating with the MSQC team over the last year. Jenny invited me to film a tutorial on quilting with my Crossroads Denim. I have also been a guest on Man Sewing, creating a recycled denim messenger bag from jeans and recently Rob released our I LOVE My Mummy pattern pillow tutorial. If you get a chance to visit the wonderful “Quilt Town” of Hamilton you will see a trunk show of our Indygo Junction apparel patterns in the main street stores. Yesterday my Missouri Star catalog arrived and our Fabriflair Radiant Star made the cover!!!

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

For the reboot I decided to combine the Love Notes block with our popular Indygo Junction Banded Baskets pattern.  Since the body of the basket is pieced in sections, it was very simple to add patchwork- a perfect canvas to showcase blocks. The fabric we chose was my new RJR line Vintage Made Modern Stitcher’s Garden combined with Crossroads Denim Eggplant. Customize your basket with colors and fabrics to make a great gift or useful storage basket for your home!

To make the basket, I used both florals and a ginghams from my Stitcher’s Garden line, and my Crossroads Denim in Eggplant for the top band, bottom section and handles.  You will also need a stiff interfacing, batting or stabilizer to give the basket some structure.  Choose a coordinating thread for the topstitching.

Using Jenny’s tutorial, cut eight 5” squares of both the gingham and the floral for the blocks, and sew all around with a quarter inch seam.  Then cut them diagonally to create four half square triangles and sew them together in a four-patch to create a ‘love note’.

Arrange all the blocks with the ‘envelope flap’ in the upper right corner and pressed the center seam up in half the blocks and the opposite way in the other half to nest the seams.  The pattern uses 3/8” seams, you don’t want to lose the points in the blocks so use a quarter inch.  Press the seams toward the denim and top stitch close to the seam on the denim side, just for a little more reinforcement.

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

After sewing the blocks together in a row, it measured 5.75” x 44”.  Since the pattern calls for a 44” long body of the basket, it worked perfectly without adjustment.

If your seams are a bit scant or more generous than a quarter inch, your measurement may be a bit more or less.   If you need to, you can add a bit of sashing at the end to bring it up to size, or adjust the other pieces to whatever your length is. (Just remember to adjust the lining dimensions, too!)

Based on the height of your block row, you will need to do a bit of math to determine how wide to cut the strip for the bottom of the basket body.  In making the large basket, the piece below the band (the pattern refers to it as the bottom) needs to be 12” tall.  Since my block is 5.75, I need a strip 6.25 plus a half-inch for seam allowance to have a 12” piece after I sew them together.

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

Sew the basket band onto the top of the row of blocks and the basket bottom onto the bottom of the pieced row to complete the outer basket body!

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

Follow the directions as written in the pattern to construct the rest of the basket.  

Just for fun, I decided to miniaturize the block by starting with a 2.5” square to make the patchwork inset in the small basket. (Pin for scale in the photo).

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

I love this combination of Stitcher’s Garden Prints! Also note that the fabric line has a signature collage print, “cheater” type fabric.  

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

Eleven blocks was exactly the correct length when sewn together.  Again, border the print fabric with strips of Crossroads Denim and add a print fabric to bring the total to the correct height for the outer basket.

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

This is a fun & easy way to add a new dimension of quilting to your home. I love the idea of making a basket to companion a quilt for gift giving and Chloe our cat does too!! Keep in mind you can use almost any block along this border in this versatile Banded Baskets pattern!  Enjoy.

Love Notes Banded Basket Tutorial

Here’s where you can find me on the web:

IndygoJunction.com (Subscribe to our eNewsletter to learn about new products, receive special offers, discounts, videos and to receive a FREE monthly pattern!)

AmyBarickman.com

Or join our Facebook group at www.Facebook.com/groups/indygojunctionpatterngroup

Meet Missouri Star: Ammon & Jarom

Meet Missouri Star: Ammon & Jarom

Today’s Meet Missouri Star post introduces you to Ammon (on the left) and Jarom. This pair of brothers can be found in the warehouse, hauling boxes, organizing arrivals and knowing exactly where things are on each shelf. They’re really pretty amazing. And like Ammon says in his interview, together they are “Jammon.” Ha! Want to meet them? Let’s go!

AmmonJarom

Ammon

Ammon is our warehouse manager and has been with us for two years now. Sarah is his sister-in-law, so though he’s not a Doan, he’s definitely family! 

Any special experience that helps you with your position? I worked for 11 years for a company that merchandised in Walmarts, was in a lot of Walmart back rooms and delt with all different kinds of product. Stocked, did inventory counts, helped customers find what they wanted, and had to remember all the things we had avalable for sale. Turns out, all those things are very useful still!

How’d you land the job? My sister-in-law and friend,  Sarah, called me one day and asked if I would be interested in working for them. I said, “No.” I was happy with my job of 11 years. But something kept bugging me to check it out, so I did. Came in to check it out, met with Sarah, had decided to take a chance and take the job. Sarah spent the next 30 min or so trying to talk me out of taking the job because they couldn’t pay what I was currently making, but I am so glad she didn’t. It has been a crazy ride so far, but a worthwhile one. And it is great to be working with family and all the wonderful people at MSQC. What a story and what a ride. Thank you Sarah for the job, and for not talking me out of it. 😉

Do you sew? I can sew. Buttons on shirts, patches on pants and things like that. I have yet to attempt a quilt. That will be someday in the future for me! I do have a fabric line picked out for my first one!

Any crazy work stories to share? Everyday is a crazy work story for me! We receive thousands of pounds of fabric everyday, I did most of that all by myself for about a year. Just recruited my little brother Jarom, and we got twice as busy after he came, so thank goodness he came when he did. All alone I was just Ammon, you add Jarom to the mix, and now we are Jammon! Life is good. 😉

Favorite type of fabric? The fabric line called Gorjuss, and I am also a big fan of the socky line

What do you like best about your job? Working with my family. And being close to home. And meeting people from all over the world!

Anything else you want to share? I have a beautiful wife named Cyndi, five boys and one baby girl. I love movies ( big Tim Burton fan), books, frisbee, and basketball, love to bounce on the tramp with my kids and just hang with them. I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and love Jesus 😉 am a bit of a goofball, and my wife says I’m a flirt. I also love skulls (very fond of my own), am a fan of the outdoors, love all the little plants and animals that you really have to search for, like blue tailed skinks, oreals, snakes, and spiders (especially jumping spiders). But even though I like the out of doors, I’m not a fan of camping!

Jarom

Jarom is Ammon’s warehouse assistant and has been with MSQC for three months now. 

Any past experience that helps you with your job? I delivered appliances and furniture for a company in Idaho for eleven years and then was a salesman for them for one year. So I have lots of lifting and product handling experience mixed with some people skills.

Do you sew? I’ve sewn some buttons back on shirts before. But no, not really.

Any funny work stories to share? I’m Ammon’s younger brother but I’m a bit bigger than him. It’s always funny when Ammon introduces me as his little brother. A few of the girls in the shipping department can’t remember my name, so they just call me Big Ammon.

Favorite MSQC product? We just got a new line in called Gorjuss. love it!

Anything else you want to share about yourself? I’m married to the most amazing woman in the whole world! We have six beautiful children. We love to spend time together reading books, watching movies, enjoying the outdoors, hanging out with grandma and grandpa and aunts and uncles and cousins.
I play the piano, love to ride my motorcycle and enjoy sports.

What do you like best about your job? Working with Ammon every day!

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How about those brothers?! Pretty awesome guys, right?! You can tell in the photo that they really enjoy being together and we love seeing family members side by side, creating such cool teams. If you enjoyed reading about Ammon and Jarom, check out the other posts in our Meet Missouri Star series. We’ll be back on Monday with more folks for you to meet! 

 

An adorable tutorial,from YOU!

An adorable tutorial,from YOU!

Our facebook friend Sandra, uploaded a picture of a quilt she made and several of us wanted directions!!  Well, it’s your lucky day!  Sandra emailed me her directions and I am thrilled to share them with you!  Oh my, don’t you just love it!!?

3 5×5 charm packs            iron and ironing surface

1/2 yard solid fabric          machine or hand sew
cutting matt                      rotary cutter
straight edge                    coordinating thread

To begin I lay out what i will need. ( sort of like cooking)
The first charm pack is cut into 4 triangles. I do this by laying my ruler from corner to corner and cutting with my rotary cutter. Then without disturbing the fabric i lay the ruler to the opposite corners and cut again. So you are cutting an X. That gives you 4 triangles the same size. These are mixed up and sewn into the hour glass block style using 4 triangles. Next the charms from pack number 2 are cut into 3 equal strips (approx. a scant 1 3/4″) You mix these up and sew into blocks of three strips each. Now cut each of these into 3 equal strips, mix up again and sew three strips each to make your nine patch style block. Now is a good time to iron each block if you haven’t after each step. Next you will sew together alternating 9 patch and hour glass for a total of 8 blocks in a strip. I do have one block at the end of the last row that is solid. I use this to either sign and date or embroider a message to the receiver. Then sew these strips together to form your quilt.

Cut your solid fabric into 3 1/2 x 44 (fabric width) this is your first boarder. Attach down the sides first then trim excess. Next sew top and bottom strips. Trim now as these pieces are too long as well. Charm pack number 3 is cut in half and the pieces are sewn end to end to make the outside boarder. These are also sewn down the sides trimed and then top and bottom.  Trim the extra fabric and you are ready to quilt.

FYI:  the fabric she used was Garden Song, by Nancy Halverson from Benartex.

Thanks so much for sharing your directions Sandra!  I can’t wait to make mine!  I am just in love with the quilt!

Have a great day to you all, and don’t forget to enter our giveaway, for your chance to win a free class with Jenny!  Go here!

Sarah